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Disco and soul in Rae Town

面白い記事を見つけたのでレコードの音源も付けながら何日かかけて紹介したいと思います。

あの雰囲気は行かないと分からないですが、この音源で少しでもRae Townを感じて貰えればと思います。

オリジナルの記事

記事のリンク先が無くなると何の事か分からなくなるので長いですがコピーしときます。

Mel Cooke, Gleaner Writer

'Twas another Sunday night, a quarter moon was overhead and the road to the main clump of Rae Town oldies fans was lined on both sides with cars, parallel parked on the left and facing outwards on the right.

'Twas close to 2:00 a.m. and Rod Stewart was demanding "if you think I'm sexy, just reach out and touch me." The Gleaner passed one woman in white, rocking in front of a steaming soup pot, her partner reaching into his wallet to touch hard cash. Maybe he was proving, as was pounding from the speakers, that "I'll do anything for you."

Dropping legs

'Twas twirling in the streets, one man in shiny imitation lizard-skin boots dropping legs, a young man sporting canerows grooving close with his older partner, whose hard facial lines were not softened by the merry Rock The Boat.

Through the bulk of the oldies fans, gathered where the beat was loudest, and through the other side, a young man dangled his lady's purse unselfconsciously. And as the music changed to soul, a Rastaman unselfconsciously put a finger in the air, walked out from his chill spot against a wall and shouted 'woah!' as David Ruffin crooned "it's not that I don't love you" at the start of Walk Away From Love.

Another Rastafarian man pulled the driver's door of a white station wagon and flicked his lighter on, dabbing the flame first on the end of his spliff and then on a stick of incense which he stuck into the dashboard. Another lit stick went into the blonde hair of a young man leaned against the car; it did not help his case, though, when he called to a skinny girl walking by and was dismissed.

It was a good run of soul which the singles and couples enjoyed alike. It was a stepping tempo at first, with Lou Rawls' You're Gonna Miss My Loving, a gentleman whose pants would have gone well with the lizard-skin boots changing a couple partners.

Cruisin was the first really slow song, a man's grey hair meeting the blonde-and-black tresses of his partner in a hip-grinding crossing of the generation gap. One of a Japanese trio seemed fascinated by a dog, which was momentarily interested in the video camera focused on it, before the selector went into the night's over-the-top soulful pair of Teddy P's Turn Off The Lights and Love TKO.

The man with the bag still had it dangling from his hand, but now said hand was placed possessively on the plump posterior of his partner. A car's headlights picked out a hot-stepping couple as it moved through the crowd; they did not miss a beat as they swayed gracefully out of its way.

Reason to whoop

There was another double, this time from Lionel Richie with Easy Like Sunday Morning and Hello. Reasons was reason to whoop; the opening lines of Kenny Rogers' Write Your Name (Across My Heart) was reason to cheer.

"After a storm there must be a calm," the selector said, but the uptempo version of Psalm 23, which he went for, brought a spiritual fire. The Gleaner left the party people giving witness and called it a morning at another Rae Town Sunday night oldies party.

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